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Bowhunting: A Rewarding and Challenging Sport

Bowhunting is a rewarding and challenging sport that has been around for centuries. It is a form of hunting that uses a bow and arrow to take down game. Bowhunting is a great way to get outdoors and enjoy nature while also honing your skills as a hunter.

Bowhunting requires a great deal of skill and knowledge. It is important to understand the basics of archery, such as proper form and technique, as well as the different types of bows and arrows available. It is also important to understand the laws and regulations of bowhunting in your area.

Bowhunting is a great way to get close to nature and observe wildlife in its natural habitat. It is also a great way to hone your hunting skills and become a better hunter. Bowhunting requires patience, focus, and a keen eye. It is important to be aware of your surroundings and to be prepared for any situation.

Bowhunting can be a very rewarding experience. It is a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature. It is also a great way to bond with friends and family. Bowhunting can be a great way to teach children about the outdoors and the importance of conservation.

Bowhunting is a challenging sport that requires skill and knowledge. It is important to understand the basics of archery and the laws and regulations of bowhunting in your area. It is also important to be aware of your surroundings and to be prepared for any situation. Bowhunting can be a very rewarding experience and a great way to bond with friends and family.

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Hunting

What You Need to Know About Hunting On Public Land

pennsylvania-game-commission-sign-state-lands

Whether hunting on family land, with permission from neighbors, on leases, or on public land, spring turkey season offers ample opportunities. If you’re gearing up for a public land hunt, or have faced challenges and are ready for another round, here’s what awaits you and how to navigate common curveballs.

Expect Interruptions

Sharing public land means dealing with other hunters, often at the most inopportune moments. Imagine having a tom gobbling his way in, only to have two groups of hunters converge and spook the bird. It’s a common scenario on public land. Murphy’s Law often applies here, and turkey hunting is no different. The key to dealing with such disruptions is adaptability. Remember, that turkey lives to see another day, giving you another chance to hunt.

One way to mitigate interruptions is to get to your spot early. Arriving before other hunters can help you secure a prime location. Additionally, setting up in less obvious spots, away from trails and roads, can reduce the likelihood of encountering other hunters. Be prepared for the unexpected and always have a backup plan.

Sharpen Your Calling Skills

Turkeys have an acute sense of hearing, able to detect the direction and distance of sounds with remarkable precision. The turkeys on heavily pressured public lands have heard it all, including sub-par calls. If your calling isn’t up to par, you’ll quickly fall behind. Consider refining your calling skills or adopting silent tactics to outsmart these wary birds.

To improve your calling, practice regularly and listen to recordings of real turkeys. Join local turkey hunting clubs or online forums to exchange tips and techniques. Using a variety of calls, such as box calls, slate calls, and diaphragm calls, can help you mimic different turkey sounds and increase your chances of success.

Beware of Private Land Sanctuaries

Many public land hunts can be frustrating when turkeys cling to adjacent private lands, safe from hunters. Often, you’ll see a flock just out of reach, spending hours trying to lure them in without success. While it’s important to try, often your efforts are better spent locating birds within public lands that are more willing to respond.

Building relationships with private landowners adjacent to public land can sometimes provide opportunities to hunt those sanctuary birds. Respecting landowners’ property and asking for permission can occasionally result in access to prime hunting areas. Additionally, scouting the boundaries of public land can help you identify areas where turkeys move between public and private lands, giving you an advantage.

Understand Turkey Behavior

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)

Turkeys, especially those that have been bumped by hunters, tend to find safe zones and stick to them. Few things are more frustrating than a tom that sees your decoys, and responds to your calls, yet refuses to commit. This usually happens when birds are wary of unfamiliar areas. Preseason scouting helps, but in-season scouting is crucial to finding these new safe zones.

Learning to read turkey behavior can significantly enhance your hunting strategy. Pay attention to their daily patterns, feeding areas, and roosting sites. Use trail cameras to monitor turkey activity and adjust your hunting locations accordingly. Understanding their behavior and adjusting your tactics can turn a frustrating hunt into a successful one.

The Hard Work Pays Off

Finding relatively unpressured games on public land is challenging but possible. According to a study by the University of Georgia, most public land hunters stick close to roads and trails. The study tracked 151 hunter outings and found that 40% of all hunter locations were within 25 yards of a road, with half of the hunter locations concentrated in just 2.9% of the area. This means that vast areas remain less pressured, offering opportunities for those willing to venture further.

Venturing deeper into public land, away from the crowded areas, can lead to discovering unpressured turkeys. Be prepared for longer hikes and tougher terrain, but the rewards can be worth the effort. Equip yourself with a good map, GPS, and plenty of water and snacks for extended hunts. The satisfaction of finding and harvesting a bird in a less pressured area is immense.

Strategies for Success

To maximize your chances of success on public land, consider the following strategies:

  • Scouting: Preseason and in-season scouting are critical. Look for signs of turkey activity, such as tracks, droppings, and feathers. Listen for gobbling at dawn and dusk to locate roosting areas.
  • Decoy Placement: Use decoys strategically to lure in wary toms. Position them in open areas where they can be easily seen. A combination of hen and Jake decoys can often provoke a territorial response from a tom.
  • Calling Techniques: Use a mix of calling techniques to mimic real turkey sounds. Start with soft clucks and purrs, and escalate to more aggressive yelps and cuts if needed. Know when to call and when to stay silent.
  • Camouflage and Concealment: Wear full camouflage, including gloves and face masks, to blend into your surroundings. Set up in natural cover, such as brush or against large trees, to break up your outline.
  • Patience and Persistence: Patience is key in turkey hunting. If a bird isn’t responding, stay put and remain quiet. Sometimes, waiting silently can coax a cautious tom into range.
  • Safety First: Always prioritize safety. Make sure you are clearly visible to other hunters by wearing blaze orange when moving. Communicate with hunting partners and establish a clear shooting plan.

Public land turkey hunting presents unique challenges, from interruptions by other hunters to the need for advanced calling skills. Turkeys often seek refuge in private land sanctuaries, making it essential to scout and find less pressured areas. With hard work, perseverance, and a solid strategy, a successful hunt is still achievable. Embrace the challenge, refine your skills, and enjoy the process of hunting turkeys on public land.

Any tips for hunting on public land? Leave them in the comment below. 

 

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Tips for Turkey Hunting with Kids: Ensuring a Successful and Enjoyable Experience

father-son-hunting

Over the past few seasons, families have been taking their children turkey hunting, creating many memorable experiences. While some hunts have led to successful outcomes, such as multiple toms and jakes being harvested, others have provided valuable lessons on how to improve the overall experience for young hunters. Here are some key insights and tips for making turkey hunting with kids a positive and educational adventure.

Taking youngsters turkey hunting can be either a thrilling adventure or a frustrating experience, largely depending on the approach taken by the adult hunters. Success in hunting often relies on prime hunting grounds and cooperative birds, but even this may not guarantee a smooth outing. The key to a successful hunt often lies in aligning the goals of the adult hunters with the desires and comfort of the young participants.

One common challenge is managing the pressure to succeed. Adults may feel a strong urge to ensure a successful hunt, which can inadvertently transfer stress to the children. This pressure can be counterproductive, leading to heightened anxiety and mistakes. It’s important for adults to remain calm and patient, focusing on making the experience enjoyable rather than solely aiming for a successful kill.

Ensuring Firearms Comfort

Dad showing boy mechanism of a shotgun rifle.

One crucial aspect of a positive hunting experience is ensuring that young hunters are comfortable with their firearms. For instance, using a small bore such as a .410 might seem appropriate, but upgrading to a 20- or 12-gauge can be more effective if the child can handle it. Comfort and confidence with the firearm are paramount.

Adults, especially those with extensive hunting experience, must remember that handling a shotgun may not come naturally to children. Providing plenty of practice opportunities and ensuring that the firearm is manageable in terms of recoil and weight can significantly boost a child’s confidence and performance. Tools like a heavy Bog Pod can help stabilize the gun and reduce recoil, making the experience more comfortable for young hunters.

Involving Kids in the Process

Father teaching his son about gun safety and proper use on hunting in nature

To foster a deeper appreciation and love for hunting, it is beneficial to involve children in the entire process, not just the hunt itself. This includes scouting, setting up blinds, and understanding animal behavior. Trail cameras, for example, can add an element of excitement and engagement in the lead-up to the season.

Taking children out before the season to listen for gobbles, look for tracks, and brush in blinds helps them understand the importance of preparation. This involvement makes the hunt more meaningful and educational. It also helps children understand the reasons behind certain decisions, such as why specific locations are chosen or why certain decoys are used.

Managing Expectations and Enjoying the Experience

Listening to the children’s needs and concerns during the hunt is crucial. If they are tired or need a break, it’s important to be understanding and flexible. The goal is to make the experience enjoyable and educational, rather than turning it into a rigorous and demanding activity.

Encouraging children to participate in calling, using binoculars, and making decisions during the hunt can increase their engagement and enjoyment. It’s also essential to explain the importance of patience and the reality that hunting involves periods of waiting and quiet observation.

Even if there are complaints about early mornings or a lack of action, these moments can be forgotten when the excitement of seeing a full strutter or hearing a gobble fills the air. By creating a positive and supportive environment, adults can ensure that children develop a lasting interest in hunting.

Turkey hunting with kids can be a rewarding experience for both the adults and the young hunters. By focusing on comfort, involvement, and managing expectations, adults can create memorable and educational hunting trips that foster a love for the outdoors and wildlife. The key is to make the hunt enjoyable, educational, and stress-free, ensuring that children have a positive introduction to the world of hunting.

Any tips for parents who want to go turkey hunting with their kids? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

 

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Ohio’s Gobblers Facing Harder Times

eastern-wild-turkey-gobbling-field-midwest

Spring turkey season results suggest that Ohio’s gobbler hunters might be facing tougher times. While the situation isn’t dire yet, any hopes for a quick rebound to the bountiful days of the past remain unfulfilled.

The 2024 spring turkey season concluded last Sunday in 83 South Zone counties, including central Ohio. The Ohio Division of Wildlife reported a total harvest of 15,426 turkeys, which is a slight decrease from last year’s total of 15,550. This year’s total includes birds taken during the statewide youth season in April, 30 days of hunting in the South Zone, and the first 23 days of hunting in the Northeast Zone. Hunting in the five Northeast Zone counties (Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Trumbull) ends at sunset this Sunday.

Although the 2024 numbers are an improvement over the alarming results of 2021 (14,546) and 2022 (11,872), they still fall short of the more prolific years. For instance, the 2018 spring take was 22,612, and the 2017 take was 21,096. From 2000 to 2010, the spring harvest exceeded 20,000 birds eight times, peaking at 26,156 in 2001.

In 1993, the Ohio Division of Wildlife introduced a two-bird limit in the 42 open counties, although the second permit initially cost double the price of the first. This premium was dropped by 2003. The two-bird limit remained until 2022 when the declining turkey population led to a reduction in the spring limit to a single bird for the first time in almost 30 years.

Some have suggested eliminating the fall turkey season or imposing restrictions on targeting hens to help the population recover. However, the wildlife division has maintained a short fall season and continues to allow the harvest of a single turkey of either sex.

An ongoing research project in Ohio aims to track changes in wild turkey habits and examine the potential effects of environmental conditions. The goal is to identify measures that could enhance survival rates. Falling turkey populations are a common worry among both gobbler advocacy groups and state and local wildlife agencies nationwide.

Of the 83 counties where the turkey hunting season has ended, Belmont led with 451 birds checked, followed closely by Monroe and Tuscarawas, each with 447. Among central Ohio counties, Licking finished top with 255 birds, followed by Fairfield (91), Delaware (78), Union (44), Franklin (17), Pickaway (14), and Madison (4).

Leave your thoughts about the situation in Ohio in the comments below. 

 

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