Connect with us

Featured

Record-Setting Buck Shooter Investigated For Poaching

horns-wild-deer-yellow-meadow

In the wake of escalating poaching allegations involving the Alexander Buck, a potentially record-breaking whitetail claimed by hunter Christopher “CJ” Alexander, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) has confirmed the confiscation of the deer and initiated an official investigation.

As per an ODNR press release, wildlife officers are delving into the circumstances surrounding the deer’s harvest during the archery hunting season in Clinton County, Ohio. Christopher J. Alexander, 28, of Wilmington, reportedly took down the deer on Nov. 9, 2023. The investigation was prompted by claims that Alexander neglected to secure the required written permission for hunting on private property.

While the inquiry unfolds, Ohio wildlife officers have taken possession of the antlers, cape, and hunting gear associated with the alleged illegal harvest.

Alexander asserts he lawfully harvested the potentially record-breaking buck on a 30-acre property owned by his sister. However, doubts have been cast on the exact location of the kill. Some forum users noted that Alexander mentioned recovering the buck during the day, yet all published photos depict the deer at night. Alexander explained that he and his friend Cory Haunert waited for Haunert’s girlfriend, who possessed a quality camera, to finish work before taking pictures.

Mike Rex, secretary of Ohio’s Buckeye Big Buck Club, assigned a preliminary green score of 206 7/8 inches to the buck. With this score, the deer could potentially claim the top spot for a typical whitetail in Ohio and secure the third position for a typical whitetail in North America. However, complications arise due to the Boone & Crockett Club’s common base rule, which may affect the rack’s official score in their books.

Beyond scoring concerns, legal complications surround the rack and Alexander’s hunt. In accordance with Section 1531.201 of the Ohio Revised Code, anyone found guilty of illegally harvesting a deer over 125 inches gross score could face a special restitution fee. This additional fine is calculated using a specific formula: ((gross score – 100)² x $1.65). If the reported gross score of 235 ⅞ inches holds true, Alexander might incur an additional fine of $30,462.33 upon conviction by DNR officials. The situation continues to unfold as the investigation progresses.

What do you think of this case? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Featured

What You Need to Know About Zeroing a Red Dot

vector-optics-red-dot-collimator-sight

Red dot optics have come a long way since their introduction in the 1970s. Initially slow to gain popularity, they are now a staple among hunters and sport shooters for everything from turkey hunting to self-defense. Even inexpensive models have proven to be useful and reliable. While red dots are fantastic once sighted in, the process of zeroing them can be a bit challenging, especially for new shooters. The lack of magnification can make precise aiming difficult, and the turret adjustments aren’t always exactly accurate. However, with some understanding and practice, zeroing a red dot becomes a straightforward process.

How Red Dot Optics Work

Red dot optics work by reflecting a red LED onto a specially coated piece of glass, creating the illusion that the dot is being projected downrange. The size and shape of the dot can vary depending on the model. The size is usually measured in MOA (minutes of angle), with one MOA equating to about one inch at 100 yards. Smaller dots (1-3 MOA) are better for long-range shooting as they don’t cover the target, while larger dots (3-6 MOA) are ideal for quick, close-range shooting.

Some red dot optics also offer various reticle designs beyond the single dot, such as a Chevron, a circle around the dot, or a cross. These designs can often be toggled to suit different shooting applications.

Red dot housings come in two main styles: tube and open. Tube sights resemble traditional scopes and are generally more durable and capable of projecting a brighter dot. Open sights, often seen on pistols, offer a wider field of view and easier target acquisition but have more exposed internal mechanisms. Tube sights are typically mounted on rifles and are better for distances beyond 100 yards, while open sights are used on pistols or shotguns for quick, short-range shooting.

How to Zero a Red Dot

Zeroing a red dot can be applied to any type of firearm, from shotguns to rifles and pistols. The basic process involves securing the firearm, getting on paper, and dialing in the reticle.

Step 1: Secure the Firearm

After mounting the red dot per the manufacturer’s instructions, support both the front and rear of the firearm. A bipod alone can get you close, but for precise hunting accuracy, it’s better to use a rear support bag or a device like a Lead Sled, which helps remove human error from the equation.

Step 2: Get on Paper

The goal here is to get a single shot on a paper target so you know how to adjust your red dot. Use your cheapest ammunition for this step. There are three main ways to achieve this:

  • Laser Bore Sighter: This device can help get you on paper at 25 or 50 yards, and higher-quality models might be necessary for 100 yards.
  • Traditional Bore Sighting: Remove the bolt and look through the barrel until the target is centered. Then, adjust the red dot to align with the target.
  • Close Range Adjustment: Start with a target at 10-15 yards, take a shot, and adjust the optic. Move the target out to 25-30 yards and repeat until you can move to 50 or 100 yards and still be on paper.

This last method is simple and effective for sighting in at shorter distances, making it easier to get those initial shots on paper.

Step 3: Get Dialed In

Once you have shots on paper, adjust your reticle based on where your shots are landing. Some red dot turrets don’t specify how much each click moves the dot, so this part involves some guesswork. Start by adjusting the reticle based on your first few shots.

For example, if your shots are low and to the right, adjust the red dot up and to the left. Once you have a shot near the bull’s eye, shoot a group of four or five shots to confirm your zero. If the center of the group is in the bull’s eye, you’re set. If not, make further adjustments and shoot another group.

A common frustration for new shooters is knowing exactly where you’re aiming with a red dot. Instead of trying to hold the dot perfectly in the bull’s eye, center the dot within the entire target square. This helps compensate for the lack of precision compared to magnified optics.

Red dots, originally invented by hunters for quick shots of fast-moving games, have found their place in modern hunting and shooting sports. They offer benefits for everyone, from hunters with aging eyes who need a clear, single dot, to big woods hunters needing quick shots, and even to kids learning to shoot. Their simplicity—keep both eyes open, put the dot on the target, and pull the trigger—makes them an excellent choice for a variety of applications.

By understanding how red dots work and following a clear process for zeroing them, hunters and shooters can enhance their accuracy and enjoyment in the field.

Do you have any tips for zeroing a red dot? Leave your thoughts in the comments below. 

 

Continue Reading

Featured

Understanding the Anatomy of Feral Hogs for Optimal Shot Placement

wild-feral-hog-pig-swine-sus

Mammals differ from species to species, but their chest anatomy is remarkably similar. To achieve effective and humane kills, hunters need to understand the anatomy of their game. This article provides a detailed look at the anatomy of feral hogs to better understand where shots will have the most impact. While focusing specifically on hogs, it offers sportsmen guidelines for precise target selection on other game animals as well. Key considerations include the position of the heart and the level of the spine in the forward section of the chest.

Anatomy Insights for Precision

In the provided image, the shoulder has been lifted and the near lung removed to expose the internal anatomy. The heart is situated directly above the rear edge of the leg when the animal is broadside. Main blood vessels enter and exit the top of the heart, making this area a crucial target for a swift kill.

Spine and Chest Considerations

wild-boar-hog-stands-still-country

The drop of the spine from the back to the front of the chest is significant. The yellow lines in the image mark the top of the back and the bottom of the chest, showing that in the region of the shoulder, the spine is about halfway between them. The bones of the leg angle forward at a level corresponding to the bottom of the chest, ensuring they don’t block access to the heart.

Weapon Choice and Shot Placement

The hunter’s choice of weapon greatly influences shot placement strategies. A bullet or arrow through the heart causes quick death, but adrenaline release can cause the animal to cover a significant distance in its final moments. Therefore, some rifle hunters prefer to aim for the shoulder blade and spine to anchor the animal on the spot. However, this approach is not recommended for bow hunters.

Targeting the Lungs

The lungs occupy most of the chest cavity back to the diaphragm. Shots that pierce both lungs are quickly fatal. The diaphragm arches forward into the animal’s chest out from where it attaches to the ribcage, and its paunch extends into the same area. The lungs become very thin where the diaphragm meets the ribs, making heart or lung shots ideal for bow hunters.

Precise Shot Placement

The heart sits about a third of the way from the bottom chest’s top, located right above the rear edge of the front leg when the animal is exactly broadside. For a quartering animal, the hunter must judge a spot midway between the backs of the two legs—slightly behind the back edge of the nearest leg for quartering away and in front for quartering toward. 

Anatomical Targets for Effective Shots

During the dissection, the skin on the top of the back was left intact so the shoulder could be laid back into its natural position, allowing a view similar to what a hunter would see. The heart and anterior spine locations are marked, emphasizing the significance of aiming for these areas.

Shots impacting above the spine are unlikely to result in a recovered animal. The heart remains the most reliable target. However, a rifle hunter may aim for the front location marked “spine” to anchor the animal on the spot. The spine is near the top of the back in the abdomen and the rearmost region of the chest. While the back appears to progress forward toward the head in a straight line, this illusion is due to longer and longer fins sticking up from the vertebrae in the forward part of the chest. The spine itself drops low in the chest, typically about halfway down from the top of the back to the bottom of the chest.

Choosing the Right Aimpoint

rifle-scope-targeting-wild-hog-forest

Choosing the precise aimpoint depends on the hunter’s ability, the weapon, the steadiness of the rest, whether the game is stationary or moving, and the distance to the animal. It is always best to choose targets that inspire the utmost confidence. If conditions diminish the probability of a perfect shot, consider aiming for lethal areas with bigger margins of error. For instance, the heart/lung shot offers more room for error than a spine shot.

Knowing your chest anatomy is helpful for both bow and gun hunters alike when it comes to delivering quick, lethal shots consistently. 

Do you have any tips or insights into shot placement for feral hogs? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Continue Reading

Featured

Tips for Turkey Hunting with Kids: Ensuring a Successful and Enjoyable Experience

father-son-hunting

Over the past few seasons, families have been taking their children turkey hunting, creating many memorable experiences. While some hunts have led to successful outcomes, such as multiple toms and jakes being harvested, others have provided valuable lessons on how to improve the overall experience for young hunters. Here are some key insights and tips for making turkey hunting with kids a positive and educational adventure.

Taking youngsters turkey hunting can be either a thrilling adventure or a frustrating experience, largely depending on the approach taken by the adult hunters. Success in hunting often relies on prime hunting grounds and cooperative birds, but even this may not guarantee a smooth outing. The key to a successful hunt often lies in aligning the goals of the adult hunters with the desires and comfort of the young participants.

One common challenge is managing the pressure to succeed. Adults may feel a strong urge to ensure a successful hunt, which can inadvertently transfer stress to the children. This pressure can be counterproductive, leading to heightened anxiety and mistakes. It’s important for adults to remain calm and patient, focusing on making the experience enjoyable rather than solely aiming for a successful kill.

Ensuring Firearms Comfort

Dad showing boy mechanism of a shotgun rifle.

One crucial aspect of a positive hunting experience is ensuring that young hunters are comfortable with their firearms. For instance, using a small bore such as a .410 might seem appropriate, but upgrading to a 20- or 12-gauge can be more effective if the child can handle it. Comfort and confidence with the firearm are paramount.

Adults, especially those with extensive hunting experience, must remember that handling a shotgun may not come naturally to children. Providing plenty of practice opportunities and ensuring that the firearm is manageable in terms of recoil and weight can significantly boost a child’s confidence and performance. Tools like a heavy Bog Pod can help stabilize the gun and reduce recoil, making the experience more comfortable for young hunters.

Involving Kids in the Process

Father teaching his son about gun safety and proper use on hunting in nature

To foster a deeper appreciation and love for hunting, it is beneficial to involve children in the entire process, not just the hunt itself. This includes scouting, setting up blinds, and understanding animal behavior. Trail cameras, for example, can add an element of excitement and engagement in the lead-up to the season.

Taking children out before the season to listen for gobbles, look for tracks, and brush in blinds helps them understand the importance of preparation. This involvement makes the hunt more meaningful and educational. It also helps children understand the reasons behind certain decisions, such as why specific locations are chosen or why certain decoys are used.

Managing Expectations and Enjoying the Experience

Listening to the children’s needs and concerns during the hunt is crucial. If they are tired or need a break, it’s important to be understanding and flexible. The goal is to make the experience enjoyable and educational, rather than turning it into a rigorous and demanding activity.

Encouraging children to participate in calling, using binoculars, and making decisions during the hunt can increase their engagement and enjoyment. It’s also essential to explain the importance of patience and the reality that hunting involves periods of waiting and quiet observation.

Even if there are complaints about early mornings or a lack of action, these moments can be forgotten when the excitement of seeing a full strutter or hearing a gobble fills the air. By creating a positive and supportive environment, adults can ensure that children develop a lasting interest in hunting.

Turkey hunting with kids can be a rewarding experience for both the adults and the young hunters. By focusing on comfort, involvement, and managing expectations, adults can create memorable and educational hunting trips that foster a love for the outdoors and wildlife. The key is to make the hunt enjoyable, educational, and stress-free, ensuring that children have a positive introduction to the world of hunting.

Any tips for parents who want to go turkey hunting with their kids? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

 

Continue Reading

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Join our subscribers list to get the latest news, updates and special offers delivered directly in your inbox.

Trending